Vandy Vape Pulse AIO Review: A Damn Good Billet Box Alternative

By Red •  Updated: 08/03/22 •  6 min read

The Vandy Vape Pulse AIO is a superb device with flaws so minor they can be ignored. At this price point and quality level, there’s little reason to splurge on an actual Billet Box other than bragging rights. The Pulse AIO is that good and should be in every hobbyists arsenal.


Vandy Vape Pulse AIO Review – 95%

I love Billet Boxes, I truly do. They are fun devices that make me feel like a true aficionado. If I’m honest though, they don’t make a ton of sense. Expensive, sometimes clunky to build, have a tendency to leak and only a single 18650. There have been many attempts at recreating a solid alternative, but most fall just short. The Vandy Vape Pulse AIO changes the game and boy oh boy, am I glad I got my hands on one.


Design

Vandy Vape Pulse AIO Review

It’s clear what Vandy Vape were aiming for with the Pulse AIO, a direct threat to the Billet Box. If you’re uninitiated, you’ll have trouble distinguishing between them, but there are differences and big ones.

The most obvious, the Pulse is bulkier, by a long shot and this is the first improvement over the Billet Box. The Vandy Vape Pulse AIO accepts either a single 18650 or a single 21700. That’s massive and a very welcome addition. This obviously makes the device significantly larger to accommodate the taller and thicker cell.

Aesthetically, the rest of the differences are minor on the exterior and not even worth mentioning.

Taking off the side panels, it’s again evident how targeted towards the Billet Box market this is. The Vessel tank replaces the Boro, but we’ll get to that later. There’s a proprietary chip with a small, again BB like screen, some adjustment buttons, your fire button and a USB-C charging port right below the tank. Just to the side of all that sits your battery tray.

Both side panels can be removed and allows for some interesting colour combinations and same with the fire button. As with the Billet Box, customization options are unlimited with everything up to the screws being swappable.

The Boro, sorry, I mean Vessel tank is where Vandy Vape tries their very best to differentiate from other Boro style devices and while, yes, they do, this is not where the magic lies. The Vessel is similar to the VapeSnail tanks where instead of a sliding glass door to access your bridge, it’s an all inclusive system similar to an RTA. A rubber bung allows you to fill the tank with much less effort while the bottom detaches to access the build deck. Total capacity is 3.7ml with the deck inserted.

Vandy Vape Pulse AIO Review

Vandy Vape also include a sub-ohm tank which has 5ml of juice capacity.

The drip tip works in the same way as, surprise, the Billet Box. The tip is press-fit into an adapter that not only secures your tank, but also completes the connection in order for your device to fire. The included drip tip is 510 sized, feels comfortable if a bit on the short side. Thankfully it’s not proprietary and can be changed to whatever you like.

Performance

All of this would be for naught if the Pulse AIO performed considerably worse than other boro devices, but thankfully, there’s no reason to worry. It does the basic stuff like it’s supposed to. You push the button, vapor comes out the drip tip. The 21700 battery allows for vapor to come out of the drip tip for a longer period and the adjustment buttons allow you to choose how much vapor you want to come out of the drip tip.

The appeal of these devices however is not how the chip performs, but to give you the option to run whatever bridge you want and with the Pulse AIO supporting any boro shaped tank, the options are endless.

Let’s start with the included sub-ohm tank, get the boring stuff out of the way. It’s a DTL style coil and gives a vape similar to that of Voopoos 0.15 and 0.2ohm PNP coils. Great, saturated flavour with average coil longevity.

Vandy Vape Pulse AIO Review

The included Vessel tank is a postless single coil deck with honeycomb airflow coming from all around the bottom of the coil. Flavour here is not as great as the sub-ohm tank, but building on the deck is really easy and the airflow (adjustable on the bottom of the tank) works very well. One concern I have with the Vessel tank is how loose the deck section is from the tank. It’s not an issue when in the device and screwed down, but be careful when building as it will drop with little effort.

So the real question here is, how does it perform with typical Boro bridges? I tried a few of my favourite bridges I’ve collected over the years, an Steam Tuners Insider, Xeta and Vapesnail. I can confidently (and happily) report, not a single difference was noticeable between these bridges in the BB and Pulse AIO. I also tried the cheaper BP Mods Insider all in one bridge and the resutls were similar. As cool as a DNA board is, you’d need to be very picky to justify the price difference over the board in the Pulse AIO if you’re only after a solid vape. Sure, the DNA 60 does temp control better and is massively configurable, but not everyone wants to go that in depth.

If you’re looking for a great vape without breaking the bank or partaking in a knife fight to get on a Billet Box list, the Vandy Vape Pulse AIO performs every bit as good.

Specs:

Vandy Vape Pulse AIO Conclusion

If you don’t want to pay the exorbitant cost for an authentic Billet Box or you’re willing to settle for only a slightly worse version, the Pulse AIO is a no-brainer.

Sure, it doesn’t have the build quality and it definitely doesn’t have the brag factor, but by gosh is the Vandy Vape Pulse AIO the best device I’ve used this year. Paired with a proper bridge, nothing comes close at this price.

Red

Internationally published journalist and reviewer, unofficially certified vape connoisseur. MTL, DTL, RDTL, Red takes it any which way
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